21 posts categorized "Talent"

September 08, 2014

Talent: the next high-tech innovation

PRE-AMNC BLOGThe theme of the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting of the New Champions 2014 (AMNC), “Creating value through innovation,” brings to mind some of the amazing advances in technology that has allowed companies to minimize bureaucracy, tap new markets, and extend their supply chains the world over. But how has innovation had an impact on one of their most valuable resources—talent?

It may not be entirely clear that innovation has a role to play when recruiting and retaining employees. And no wonder: many companies are still struggling with just how advances in technology can be used to innovate in the talent space. More than 40 percent of executives surveyed in Deloitte’s 2014 Global Human Capital Trends report said their companies were “not ready” to address talent as it relates to technology. But with aging populations, an increasing demand for a more select set of skills, and knowledge growing out of date at an alarming rate, the pressure to use technology to innovate is more critical than ever.

Digital technology can play a powerful role in both attracting and keeping employees. The most significant impact, of course, has been through the rise of social media. In 2013, more than 67 percent of internet users around the world used a social network at least once per month. The figure will rise to more than three out of four internet users by 2016.  And worldwide, more than one-third of workers use social media for career and employment decisions. That jumps to 51 percent in the Asia Pacific region. 

This trend is particularly prominent among millennials. For this demographic, living with digital technology is not a new reality—it’s the only reality. In almost every country, people under age 30 (and those with a college education) are more likely to engage in social networking and use a smart phone, according to a Pew Research poll.  This access and connectedness has shaped millennials’ views of work. Nearly three-quarters, according to Deloitte’s millennial survey, see themselves working independently, rather than for a company. Forty-five percent will choose workplace flexibility over pay.

Companies need to adjust their recruiting and work models accordingly. Many are already using social media extensively—more than 60 percent of HR executives say they rely on social tools for sourcing and advertising positions . But social media can do much more. With blogs, targeted ads, stories, and word-of-mouth, social media can raise a company’s profile, building appeal before ever even advertising a position.

Keeping employees also requires an innovative approach; 60 percent of millennials will leave their companies in less than three years.  Open talent networks, in which companies tap the right talent as needed, allows workers the flexibility they are seeking. Open talent networks encourage work to be designed on a project basis—a model that appeals to many millennials. Work can also be broken down into discretionary parts that can be farmed out over the network—freeing up the time of employees for more productive and challenging work.

To be sure, digital technology is still making its mark when it comes to talent. But with so many of the AMNC’s participants comprising the employers and employees of the future, the value to be created by innovating in this space couldn’t be more relevant.


Dttl_garycoleman_56x56Gary Coleman is Managing Director, Global Industries, of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited. He will be moderating the panel “Got Talent” on 11 September at the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting of the New Champions 2014.

April 29, 2014

Cautiously optimistic: Innovation and Chinese FDI

Aisa Society Image for blogA few months ago, after Summer Davos, I wrote and spoke about China’s new commitment to innovation. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in his opening address had talked of holding the banner of innovation high and the reforms his government were proposing to achieve that goal. I stated at the time that I was cautiously optimistic about the potential these reforms held.

Just recently, I again had the chance to discuss China and innovation, this time on a panel hosted by the Asia Society in New York City. With the session focused on China’s growing investment in U.S. high-tech companies, inevitably the question of innovation came up—and if these Chinese companies were looking to U.S. acquisitions to help build a culture of innovation at home. Innovation remains a challenge in China, with issues from lax enforcement of intellectual property laws to the difficulty of starting a business contributing factors. Moreover, questions have been raised about whether China’s educational system encourages the kind of creative thinking that generates innovation.

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January 28, 2014

Davos 2014: Optimism with a healthy dose of reality

Post-davos photoWith economic recovery seeming to finally take hold this year, I was not surprised that many of the Davos 2014 speakers sounded a positive note for the future. Nowhere was this more evident than in the remarks from country leaders. But these leaders understood that there is still a lot of work to be done—and it was striking how in sync they were when it came to the challenge going forward: building and sustaining growth.

South Korea is focusing on entrepreneurship and building a “creative economy,” where individuals are encouraged to start businesses and put “innovation into action,” according to President Park Geun-hye. Similarly, Liberia is making strategic investments in education and focusing on public-private partnerships to spur the rise of small and medium businesses. Mexico is working to promote start-ups by reforming fiscal policies to allow greater access to credit.

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January 27, 2014

Shaping the future together

Deloitte Davos Live video screen_300x200Times of global change require leaders with a global vision – leaders who inspire confidence and foster innovation. I see this attitude reflected in Davos. I have noticed a remarkable shift of attention at this year’s World Economic Forum. While the meetings in past years focused heavily on finance and the banking industry, representatives of the global technology industry are clearly the thought leaders now.

At the same time, politics seems to have been pushed into the background somewhat – especially, European representatives are less visible this year. But Europe’s image has not yet fully recovered after the Euro crisis and the world is closely watching how European banks will perform in the stress tests.

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January 21, 2014

Business must disrupt the status quo

Blog_joee_davos14_300x200It’s time for real change. It’s time for disruption.

In the last few years, the world has been lurching from financial crisis to financial crisis. As business leaders gathered last year at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting, the U.S. government had just narrowly averted falling off the fiscal cliff. Less than a year later, the U.S. found itself in a similar situation, which resulted in the third-longest government shutdown in U.S. history.

Despite all of this, in the U.S., and globally, there have been positive signs of economic recovery and business growth. Momentum continues and that is why I’m optimistic for the upcoming year.

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What the worker of tomorrow wants

Dttl_davos14_positiveimpact_300x200More than 1,500 business leaders are gathering here in Davos, most of them part of the C-suite in their organizations. And as they mix with heads of state, influential NGOs, and the occasional celebrity, I doubt they are thinking about workers 30ish and under.

But they should be.

By 2030, more than 70 percent of the workforce will be made up of workers born after 1983—the millennials . And according to a new survey released today by Deloitte, businesses need to be aware of three key themes on millennials’ minds: social impact, social media, and innovation.

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January 20, 2014

Womenomics in action

Goto_yoriko_300x200This year I am attending the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos as a representative from Deloitte Japan and as a Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL) board member. Even as a third-time delegate, I am always thrilled to meet great people and be exposed to new perspectives and innovative ideas.

Last year, I emphasized the importance of including women in the boardroom for business development and innovation. In fact, DTTL has increased the percentage of female board members from 8 percent to 25 percent this year. It is a great honor for me to have been appointed as one of the DTTL board of directors in addition to a board member role in Deloitte Japan.

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August 22, 2013

Running in the red in 2013: HR leaders under pressure

As I work with Chief Human Resources Officers (CHROs) at leading companies around the world, I am seeing talent challenges boiling to the surface, and HR is under pressure. 

Earlier this year Deloitte’s Global Human Capital consulting group conducted a global survey of 1,300 executives in 59 countries to rank the most relevant human capital trends facing their organizations; we were a bit surprised to find that the issues they face -- regardless of country or industry -- are very similar. The Human Capital Trends 2013 report Resetting Horizons details 13 trends which HR and business leaders need to place front and center as they shift their focus beyond the recession to the new growth opportunities ahead. The list of critical current and emerging trends includes both areas where HR needs to do new things – exploration-- and areas where HR needs to do thing better -- execution.

Not surprisingly, given the changes afoot, leadership pipelines and readiness is the top concern:  84 percent of global business and HR executives reported they must look for creative ways to develop new leaders as traditional leadership models are not keeping pace with today’s rapidly changing business and work environment. 

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June 28, 2013

An interesting week in Southeast Asia

BangkokLast month, I had the opportunity to spend a week with many Deloitte clients and colleagues in Southeast Asia (SEA). While there were many highlights, one of them certainly was my first visit to Bangkok. We started the week with a series of meetings with manufacturing executives in Bangkok which helped me to gain a better perspective on this important manufacturing economy. A few key facts about the manufacturing industry in Thailand that may interest you:

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May 15, 2013

Insights on Brazil

139695226I returned from another interesting week in Brazil and with each visit I find that I get a better glimpse of the dynamic changes happening in this market. This was my second visit in the past six months, and given the deep and ongoing interest by manufacturing companies, it certainly seems to be a place that deserves increasing attention.

During this most recent trip, I had the opportunity to meet with several senior executives at top Brazilian and multinational companies. It was fascinating to receive firsthand accounts from these manufacturing leaders on both the strengths and challenges of the current business environment in Brazil and their outlook on prospects for the future. Not surprisingly, despite the diverse manufacturing sectors these leaders represented, their insights had very common themes.

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